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Skinmaker's Sickness.


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Skinmaker's Sickness
noun. 

An inherent inability to refrain from, or overwhelming compulsion to, add extremely fine details to aircraft skins in IL2: Great Battles, despite the fact that such details would remain generally imperceivable during gameplay. An inability to create a finished product owing to constantly seeking aesthetic betterment, or even perfection, of designs and appearance of a skin. 

 

Morning, gents. I've driven the 3rd Pursuit Group to madness with my skin-pack updates as I work towards repainting our SPAD XIIIs, so I thought that I'd give them a break by irritating you fine people with my skinmaking nerd-isms instead. 

I became the 3rd Pursuit Group's "Paintmeister" largely through the fact that we didn't have one, and I'd tried my hand at it before. What that led to was myself falling down a seemingly infinite rabbit hole of perfectionism, where I became totally determined to make our skins as totally "real" as they could possibly be. 

At first this started with me trying to switch the "Font" numbers our old ships had to properly "Handpainted" numbers - from there, I wanted "handpainted numbers" that actually looked like they had been applied by brush strokes, and it only got worse from there. 

I'm just gearing up for the next big 3rd P.G. overhaul, which will hopefully include a uniquely hand-painted insignia per aircraft based on a basic template (as the real Lafayettes and 3rd P.G. guys did), as well as individually-painted-on numbers for fuselage sides and wings. Being so very interested in historical authenticity, this means that any new SPADs the group takes on will have to wait for their markings and insignia to be 'painted' on! 

As there are a couple skin-makers among you chaps, I thought I'd share some of the madness for any interested parties. 
 


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The first 103rd insignia has been completed, although the "Stencil" isn't yet done. Instead, this one was traced over a real 103rd head. For this one I was really trying to capture the "handpainted onto fabric" look, which I hope to have on all the numbers and insignia! 

uWcTRdD.png

 

 


 

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Your own resident paint-genius @Vonrd may be on to something...

Played around with a section of the Normal Map to try and get rid of the really irritating "Wet" or "Metal" look that shiny WW1 ships have, and the results of the first quick test looked quite promising....

The red line divides the unedited portion and the edited portion of the N.Map 

tiVFnc0.jpg

it may just be the in-game lighting and angle (I only had a brief look) but it would seem like the edited portion looks far more like the smooth, almost "Matte" reflectivity of doped linen. The unedited portion shows the "Problem reflectivity" - which looks pretty bizarre and certainly doesn't look like doped linen. 

Luckily I've had the chance to see both real and airworthy reproduction WW1 birds up close, and the altered shine looks actually quite similar to what I recall - cheers Vonrd! 


I've also finally finished the majority of the work for the first of our new Bleriot-Built SPAD XIIIs for the 3rd PG skin pack 3.0. Here's a comparison of one of the old v1.0 skins vs the new v3.0's. The shading messes with the image a little, but you should be able to get the picture. No.13 still needs its unique Indian head and some other alterations. 

BU2EXWh.jpg 

tcmjoXK.jpg

And the real deal: 

gvKepP9.jpg 

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Outstanding work, @DeFreest Larner!

Question: since many US and French SPADs had a tritone green camo, how have you been able to match the patterns on your skins?

Was there regulations that said all camo patterns had to be similar, and thus it saves you from having to figure it out?

Or do you have to research each aircraft with written and photographic evidence?

I ask because you've done a great job of creating the pattern in the above skin.  Though, the yellow green and the light green are so close in the black and white photo that they may as well be invisible.  For example, I think I can sort of see that the yellow green actually cuts through the headdress of the 103rd insignia in the photograh.  Where as on your skin, the dark green is right behind it in the same shape.

Just curious!

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 @Klaiber  Thank you sir!

The short answer - Pretty much yes, you have to go photo-by-photo! But, there are some things we know about SPAD camo that can help fill in the gaps. 

The long answer: 

The French 5-Colour Camo is a pretty tricky subject, and has definitely been one of the biggest and most gruelling "research projects" for the recreation of the U.S. Spads. It all depends on how accurate you want to be... 

Several firms built SPAD XIIIs during the war, with the vast majority of USAS Spads being built by Kellner, Bleriot and Adolphe Bernard. SPAD had issued a standardised 5-colour paint scheme to these manufacturers, but scrutiny of the aircraft reveals that each manufacturer had their own distinctive "take" on the pattern itself, which can be identified by various different telltale signs. No.13 pictured above is a Bleriot pattern. 

From identifying the manufacturer, you can take a good guess at the general camo layout - but the next 'level' of research would be to identify different serial batches. The manufacturers would largely follow the same patterns, but individual batches (E.G, a 2700-series Bleriot or a 15000-series Bleriot) would have their own little deviations from the factory's general pattern. 

The good news is, though, if you can identify which factory the Serial came from, you can usually get a pretty good approximation of the camo scheme.

the biggest challenge (as you picked up on!) comes from trying to 'decipher' the orthochromatic film that cameras used back then! Not only does orthochromatic film have a very unique look (being non-sensitive to red light and highly sensitive to blue light), but there are tons of things that can affect the overall picture - type of film, type of camera, time of day, even the time of year! 

A fitting example to use would be the famous Jasta 11 line-up photograph - just look how dark the (assumedly) bright red shows up! 

bkfSjqp.png 

All of this can obscure the camo pattern, and can also have some very strange side-effects (such as No.13's camo apparently not having any black paint in it - even though it surely did unless the SPAD was prematurely rushed out of the factory!)  For reference, here's another photo where the dark green (overlapped by the Number 2) can be seen very clearly against the light green...! 

o1V3J3p.jpg

Note also how much brighter the number appears, and how the blue of the Indian head feathers appears to be white! 

The final piece of the puzzle, which makes identifying the camo even harder, is that it's probably the case that the dope wasn't always correctly mixed (there was a very specific technique to the mixing of French 5-colour dopes that was outlined in excruciating detail by a USAS report) , and that the dope also contained aluminium powder which would alter the appearance of the camo under certain light...the discrepancies in colour coupled with the 'weirdness' of orthochromatic film lead to a lot of educated guesses having to be made! 


Re: the Indian head placement - I noticed that after I took the screenshot (it never fails!!!) - another picture of S.2742 (No.13) also shows that the stylisation of the Indian head on the side is just a teensy bit off. She's "fit for purpose" at the moment, but No.13 will later be receiving a uniquely-painted Sioux as closely matched to the real No.13 as I can get it! 

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A good example of how extreme the orthochromatic effect can be is seen here on Capt. Hambleton of the 213th's SPAD XIII. Hambleton's aircraft bears the C.O's tricolour stripe on the fuselage - his was painted blue/white/red, but in the picture you can't distinguish at all between the blue and the white, and the red looks pitch black! The same thing can be seen on the rudder. 

mVZBO0o.png

As a point of interest, this has actually been one of the biggest mysteries plaguing the USAS paint shop at the minute - the 213th's numbers have always been assumed to be painted in black, but they could just as easily have been red! 

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5 hours ago, DeFreest Larner said:

Your own resident paint-genius @Vonrd may be on to something...

Played around with a section of the Normal Map to try and get rid of the really irritating "Wet" or "Metal" look that shiny WW1 ships have, and the results of the first quick test looked quite promising....

The red line divides the unedited portion and the edited portion of the N.Map 

tiVFnc0.jpg

it may just be the in-game lighting and angle (I only had a brief look) but it would seem like the edited portion looks far more like the smooth, almost "Matte" reflectivity of doped linen. The unedited portion shows the "Problem reflectivity" - which looks pretty bizarre and certainly doesn't look like doped linen. 

Luckily I've had the chance to see both real and airworthy reproduction WW1 birds up close, and the altered shine looks actually quite similar to what I recall - cheers Vonrd! 


I've also finally finished the majority of the work for the first of our new Bleriot-Built SPAD XIIIs for the 3rd PG skin pack 3.0. Here's a comparison of one of the old v1.0 skins vs the new v3.0's. The shading messes with the image a little, but you should be able to get the picture. No.13 still needs its unique Indian head and some other alterations. 

BU2EXWh.jpg 

tcmjoXK.jpg

And the real deal: 

gvKepP9.jpg 

Genius??!!... nah, just your run of the mill sub-genious  🤓

That looks great! I think the "sheen" is much more appropiate now.

What did you do? Did you tone down the weave? I hope to see your normal map once you get it finalized. 

How are you manipulating the normal maps? Are you using the Nvidia normal map plug in in for photoshop or something else?

I had another thought that you could incorporate the brushstrokes from your insignia into the normal map to give the strokes a subtle 3D affect.

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The trouble seemed to be coming from some magenta tones in the N-map - I replaced those tones with the lavender that most of the N map is made up of. I'll be sure to drop it off here when it's done - ATM I'm just messing with the N map, making extreme changes and seeing what happens, etc. You can get some absolutely crazy effects with some colours...! 

Much as I'd love to get those brush strokes in there, each plane is likely to have a different Sioux (or at least a different placement). There are some details missing from the default that I'm hoping to add in though! (Main one being that little factory tag you can barely spot just above the 3 of No.13). 

I'm also going to see if I can take out the indent for the mechanic's plate. Much as I'd love to leave it in, the various SPAD manufacturers would bolt the plate on in different places to one another, so some of our SPADs would inevitably end up with a "Phantom" plate indent. 

EDIT: I'm using the Nvidia .DDS plugin - don't know if that's the same one you mean!

EDIT 2: Either the magenta tones were causing the weird 'wet' shine, or the combination of them and the lavender tones beside each other were. Will keep posting with N map findings! 

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1 hour ago, DeFreest Larner said:

EDIT: I'm using the Nvidia .DDS plugin - don't know if that's the same one you mean!
 

Yup... that's what I use.

Yeah, all of the editing of n-maps is a PITA if there are differences from one skin to the next. Even if you did seperate ones for each skin (oh my head hurts!) good luck getting everyone to download and install them. Too bad they're not attached to the dds file like the alpha maps are.

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Yeah, if each skin had an individual Normal Map that would be a big headache gone.....

After some further testing last night I think that generally the lavender / more muted purple tones will offer less extreme reflectivity and the indigo / pinker tones will be more aggressively reflective (and start to stray from the 'doped' look). This is a bit of a generalisation, but it seemed to be the case from what I could tell. 

On a semi-related note (might be of some interest regarding Jasta 10), I also did some testing for the 103rd's 'Chrome Yellow' numbers. I have a little bit of a love-hate relationship with the colour yellow in terms of FC skinning (about 2 parts love and 98 parts hate). While skinning the USAS birds I've discovered that the colours you are using can be reeeeaaaaaaalllllllyyyyy deceptive in the template - eventually coming out really weird in-game. 

Yellow is probably the most temperamental colour in that regard. It has a tendency to end up looking like a construction workers' hi-vis jacket in-game, even though it looks great on the template. 

For the 103rd's yellow numbers I started out with....well....yellow! However, using just a yellow shade would appear very neon-y in the game, and certainly didn't look like a realistic depiction of paint. I was using something around this colour - typically what you'd think when somebody says "Yellow": 

ewA15Cim.png

As I played around with it some more, I started introducing some more orange tones into the colour - which immediately made a huge difference to the in-game appearance. After slowly dialling it in, I settled on F59014 for the 103rd's numbers: 

e3WB1Ppm.png

As you can see, that's very orange looking on its own. I would paint the numbers above the weathering layer to avoid decolouration - but on one test I decided to paint them below the weathering layers so that they'd be nicely weathered along with the other markings. For that I had to use this shade(!!!!)

SCzYcDlm.png

At a glance, you'd think there's no way that would come up looking like an accurate representation of a number painted in yellow - but just have a look at this screenshot I took while testing the visibility of 103rd numbers at a distance! 

LzGMkUmm.png

I think that looks spot on, personally! 

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Yeah, color rendering has been another PITA. This is what Heinrich, Klai and I have come up with so far. I'm generally using cda40a for yellow on the WW2 birds and bf9c00 for WW1. Red is also problematic. I use 941f17 for WW2 and 830002 for WW1.

All are below the shadows, weathering, etc. layers. Colors seem to vary from template to template and even within various areas of the model.

What is the number or RGB numbers for your orange / yellow?

Colors Heinrich 11-15-20.png

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@Vonrd Currently using F59014 for FC yellow! Several different reds being used atm, will need to check them all later...


....Here's a fun one: The list of known 213th airframes. This is just one of our four squadrons.....I think we might be on FC Vol.7 or Vol.8 by the time this pack is ready LOL! 

 

um4Iu7j.png EKIvUGK.png

In order to "Minimise" (ha!) the workload, the plan is to constrict each squadron to minimum needed aircraft initially, then eventually  Aircraft Numbers 1 through 24

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Btw: I'm not sure if this really helps (or is just quaint) but are you both aware of computer programs that use AI to colorize photographs? 

Basically, the program looks at the photo, checks for objects that it recognizes, and then guesses as to the color / hue of that object or person based on what it already knows.  Sometimes they're way off (because it can't recognize what it's looking at).  But, sometimes they help give you a new perspective on the image you're trying to figure out.  Background details you missed, for example.

A free version of one of these programs is Algorithmia:

https://demos.algorithmia.com/colorize-photos

This is just one of many.

Here is a test I ran through Algorithmia's demo:

Algorithmia_US103.png

Wrong.  But interesting.

Then, compare those results to what Colourise.com gave me: https://colourise.com/upload/

Colourise_US103.jpg

Still wrong.  But I can see some details I missed in the black and white.

Then, through DeepAI.org: https://deepai.org/machine-learning-model/colorizer

DeepAI_US103.jpg

Again, it's interesting what different programs will do with the same image.

For comparison, here is Jasta 11, first through Algorithmia:

Algorithmia_J11.png

It doesn't know the "black' is red, so everything is off.  But its recognizing wood.  And I can now see details on the aircraft in the back of the line-up.

Now through Colourise:

Colourise_J11.jpg

Now through DeepAI.org: 

DeepAI_J11.jpg

You can do this with WW2 photos to, and it's not too bad.  This is through DeepAI:

DeepAI_Luft.jpg

This Bf 109 of Maj. Horst Carganico is actually in Luftwaffe grays (RLM 74, 75 and 76).  And its making it too brown. But it recognizes his face is flesh colored, for example.

As I said, this might be a good tool to use when you're completely stumped and need an outside opinion on something.

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Yes, I have tried these and they're interesting and may allow a bit of filtration in order to identify details. However, regarding color interpretation, without some verbal or text regarding the colors it's nearly impossible to decipher individual colors from Orthochromatic film images (common in use in WWI. By WWII some Panchromatic film was in use) but what really shakes the dice is that we have no idea whether filters were being used and, if so, which ones they might be. 

This from a modelers site:

  • US made b&w film was made to be less sensitive to blue light. US photogs tended to use orange filters more.
  • German film was made to be more sensitive to reds. Use of light [very pale] yellow filters more common.
  • French made film was more sensitive to greens. Use of mid-yellow filters more common.
  • British films were more sensitive to reds/greens. Use of light to mid yellow filters more common.
  • Russian films tended towards an ortho film. No use of filters common.
  • All western films changed about 1958, to a more common pan film and sensitivity ratings - ASAWarPac films changed between 1968-72, to about three types of pan film, ranging from near ortho to true pan and two sensitivity ratings - GOST and DIN

and this:

 Ordinary or common film ( color-blind ) was sensitive to light in the blue spectrum, violet and ultraviolet, and besides being cheaper, it only required yellow -green or red light in the darkroom. Using this film the red and yellow tones in the final print looked very dark and the clouds of a blue sky tended to become invisible, blending into the background unless a filter was used.

- Orthochromatic films themselves, sensitive to the spectra blue, violet, ultraviolet, but also green and yellow in varying degrees depending on the quality and type. These films require dark red light in the development phase and while the yellow tones can be lighter in print than using colour-blind film, their hue varies depending on the quality of the emulsion and the processing, while red tones still appear dark, seen that the film is not sensitive to red light. They were often the preferred choice for portraits because of the good rendering of contrast.

- Panchromatic film, sensitive to blue, violet, ultraviolet, green, yellow and red, while translating the colors into shades of gray closer to the experience of the human eye, remained also variable in the results because of its quality, conservation status and the skill of those who developed it, and it required total darkness in the darkroom. This films, however, offered a reduced contrast compared to common and orthochromatic .


With all of these kinds of film the use of filters was very common: yellow and amber, in particular, often intended to diminish - with variable results - the effect of ultraviolet light, invisible to the eye but very visible on film, or to correct contrast and brightness of the final result . At the time the use of these filters was an integral part of the art of the photographer, and they were used very often.


The above is an extreme simplification of the technology available at the time, and there were in fact emulsions which came "halfway" between the types described, despite being advertised and sold as orthochromatic or panchromatic. The subject would deserve much more research and I am sure I have just scratched the surface of what we could find.

I hope that this may help a better understanding of how difficult – and indeed treacherous – the interpretation of colours from B/W prints can be.

Peter Jackson's "They Shall Not Grow Old"'s impact, for me was due more to the fining of the grainy detail, slowing the framerates and adding overdubbed sound. The colors are believable. Whether or not they are correct is immaterial.

The above wave of discourse is just a (probably too) verbose way of saying that we can never be certain of true colors (even existing swatches / examples are subject to fading / changing). My feeling is to make things believable.

 

And Klai, yes I understand your point of using it as a tool to find hidden details and not to find actual colors.

I did minor in photography in grad school and focused almost entirely on B&W view camera.

Interesting comparison of two film types:

Orthochromatic-Panchromatic-film-1024x768-1.jpg

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40 minutes ago, Vonrd said:

And Klai, yes I understand your point of using it as a tool to find hidden details and not to find actual colors.

Yeah, I'm not suggesting this to find the real colors.  You're only going to be able to do that with research.  But, as you said, you can use these programs to find hidden details that you missed.  Especially in complex photographs.  And especially if you have a good understanding of the different types of film stock and what they do to images.

I think the example you have above regarding Orthochromatic and Panchromatic is perfect.

And keep in mind too, these are just the free software.  The pay ones that are obviously much much better.  And that the more modern the photograph, the easier a time it's going to have.

But even the pay software makes clear mistakes.  Making a light pink dress light blue, or something that's orange into blue.  It's a moving target really, and only good to assist in identification of anomalies and areas of interest.

40 minutes ago, Vonrd said:

Peter Jackson's "They Shall Not Grow Old"'s impact, for me was due more to the fining of the grainy detail, slowing the framerates and adding overdubbed sound. The colors are believable. Whether or not they are correct is immaterial.

Funny enough, even though they did an amazing amount of research, they got stuff wrong.  The Mark V tanks you see in that movie are all green.  In reality, they were a neutral brown color.

For example: https://youtu.be/DmR_Z0dggQ0?t=37

 

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Good stuff! Thanks @Klaiber ! The navy blue example is especially helpful - we're trying to decipher the correct shades for USAS roundels and nose cowlings atm, and blue is a tricky one.....


......Back to the super-exciting 3rd P.G skin pack, here's the next tricky part....enforcing the 3rd P.G's paint policy! We're looking at a full overhaul going into FC2, which will see the retirement of several 3rd Pursuit Group spads (my beloved "No. 0" among them 😢), which will be kept on as unassigned "heritage" aircraft, not to be used on official squadron nights. 

Historical accuracy is very near and dear to us as a unit, and the new policy will reflect that - as personal pilot marking was such a big part of the Lafayette's identity we'll be allowing personal markings (so long as they're up to snuff historically), but USAS ships (where the markings were much more rigid and uniform) will be retained in their full historical livery - with no personal insignia allowed. Just like the real USAS, you simply take what you're assigned! 
 

LDdmhRF.png

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Cheers @Klaiber ! I'd suspect one or two less-than-happy campers with the first batch of S.VII submissions as the more, er, 'expressive' ideas are dialled back to 'historical standard'...I've already had to reject my own first submission 😅

One thing that's always been really fascinating to me is how attached pilots get to their assigned USAS numbers, even if the number bears zero significance to them before having it assigned. It's almost always the case that 3PG pilots are gutted at having to part with "their" number if they get reassigned to a unit, and the guys will usually ask to be assigned to the same number if they switch between 103 / 93. 

One particularly funny case was one of my 93rd boys - he was originally on "12" and I later moved him to "4". He was pretty sad to 'lose'  "12", but he accepted it. After a couple months he went to the 103rd and was put on "12" over there....only to request to be reassigned to "4"! 

...speaking of numbers, the next stage of "the sickness" has been to try and recreate the handpainted numbers of the 93rd and 103rd. These will later be used as templates and "Re-traced" onto individual XIIIs with the end goal of making each one look hand-painted in the fields of France! 

The current numbers are traced from existing photos of the two Squadrons - not the easiest task considering most photos have the aircraft off at an angle! The hard part will be trying to "eyeball" the missing numbers and keep them in the correct style for the unit (especially hard with the 103rd, with their pretty French-style numbers!). 

cQp1CPO.png

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Here's a time-lapse of the "upgrading" of No.13! Fair warning, there's quite a lot of "flash-y" screen swapping - I'd recommend setting the video speed to 50% if you're finding it a bit much. 

Again, sound muted so you can play your favourite tunes while watching ;) 

Enjoy! 

 

 

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10 hours ago, DeFreest Larner said:

One particularly funny case was one of my 93rd boys - he was originally on "12" and I later moved him to "4". He was pretty sad to 'lose'  "12", but he accepted it. After a couple months he went to the 103rd and was put on "12" over there....only to request to be reassigned to "4"! 

We're all a superstitious lot.  It happens in JG1 too. ;)

5 hours ago, DeFreest Larner said:

Here's a time-lapse of the "upgrading" of No.13!

That's a lot of fun to watch.  I really admire your dedication to get things just right.  Honestly, its definitely worth it, as its extremely possible that you might notice something that others might have missed.

Recreating paint schemes is always a moving target, due to advances in research and better access to primary information.  Yes, as time passes, you lose access to the men and women who where there.  But, our ability to remember details like color and such is actually pretty poor.  And really, its the digitization of original sources (like diaries, unit records, photographs, manuscripts, film recordings, etc.) that has really been the godsend to better accuracy.  You can very clearly see a delineation between sort-of accurate and very accurate in the profile books on your shelves.  Anything prior to the 1990s is probably imprecise and even downright wrong.

Even the historical JG Nr. I, one of the most lauded and researched units in military aviation history, is still having new things discovered.  From figuring out the actual shade of Jasta 11 red, to actually being able to identify which pilot had which markings and when.  One of the best debates I remember about JG Nr. I on the Aerodrome forums was about what color Ernst Udet's most famous DR.I was:

http://www.theaerodrome.com/forum/showthread.php?t=29128

He had three, as I remember.  But here's Udet's Fokker Dr.I 586/17 as commonly viewed:

http://www.fokkerdr1.com/586_17.htm

Inherited from Ltn. Hans Kirschstein, its shown as black and white.  Just with Udet's LO painted on the side (for his childhood sweetheart (later wife), Eleanor "Lo" Zink).

But, here is what a few researchers thought it actually looked like:

Udet DR[1].1 Abbott-1c.jpg

Talk about a difference...

Even for us, Vonrd and Heinrich tried many different shades of red from many different sources to get the "Richthofen red" we landed up with.  And we're not even trying to recreate historical aircraft, just create pseudo-historical aircraft that are easy to see in-game.  Some were downright orange, while others were basically red-black.  How can orange and red-black be the same aircraft?!  As Von mentioned above, he and Heinrich eventually settled on 830002 (dark red) because it was somewhere in the middle of our choices (a good guestimate) and looked the best in game.

One of the best videos to cover just what conservators need to do with real aircraft is this one regarding the restoration of the Memphis Belle:

 

There is also this very interesting video regarding the painting of a PzKpfw VI (Tiger I) at the Tank Museum in Bovington, UK.  It's a rabbit hole.

 

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@Klaiber Wow, that profile of Udet's Triplane is insane!!! 

Funnily enough, I immediately saw it in "Black and White" when I saw the red and blue stripes...I've been looking at too many Orthro SPADs recently :D

I've always appreciated the craft of restoration - on the surface it just seems as simple as "Re-paint it so it looks shiny", but there's so much toil that goes into it...a real labour of love! I think only Skin-makers and Model-makers qualify as being as mad, ha! 

I got to see Tiger 131 make the rounds at Bovington once. What a beast....

EDIT: Solved the mystery of the "Black-less" camo on No.13...Greg VanWyngarden mentioned to me that he'd originally scanned the image from a book put out by two Lafayette guys - J.N. Hall and C. Nordhoff which was released in 1919(?). The image of No.13 had been doctored before being published, hence the particularly unusually muted appearance of No.13

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Just now, Vonrd said:

Went down the Google Rabbit hole and stumbled across this:

http://www.fokkerdr1.com/Mainpage.htm

I was particularly interested in the factory construction photos.

Nice find! I love it when you get your hands on stuff like that - aircraft being assembled, factory finished, etc.  There's a fantastic one from the Levasseur firm of the factory workers hand- painting a camo scheme onto a partially-constructed SPAD XIII, which played a big part in the overall "Look" of the last batch of XIIIs (Once I saw that image I knew they had to be "Handpainted" too. (See: Skinmaker's sickness) 

Great find! 

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