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Luftritter

German prop pitch video

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Not sure any of you have seen this or anything similar before; but I found this video explaining not only the basics of prop pitch and indicators, but also the details of the different types of automatic prop pitch regulation systems used on the 109's and 190's.  I thought the video was outstanding.

 

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Very good, I heard one discrepancy between the two videos. The video I posted states that the indicator moves between the 12:30 to 8:30 positions. Brit's video states that it moves between the 12:30 to 4:30 positions. I have a feeling that Brit's video is correct. However those of you who fly these machines all of the time will probably know the correct answer right away.

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The difference is between the DB601 and DB605.  I tested this in game between the Bf-109E7 and G6.  The G6 could only run out to 830 but I surprisingly found the E7 could completely feather out to 3 o'clock.  Probably the F4-G4 models are limited to 430.

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When he says "course" he means coarse as in rough.  Just FWIW....  He says that the manual pitch control was a big disadvantage in combat.... but in reality the "pitch" of the engine (sorry, couldn't resist) was SO obvious that it was really easy to keep the RPM in your head. You can most definitely tell the engine is straining at very high RPMs. This is a question mark in the aircraft I cannot address... but in the game it is about the only thing that the Bf-109 has going for it (CLOD) is the ability to squeeze extra performance out of the airplane when flying against the SUPER-marine Spitfires. (emphasis on the SUPER) If you leave the E-4 in auto pitch control you give away a LOT of performance. If you learn to manage the manual prop control.... and the game designers slowed down the ability to change the prop pitch which makes is that much tougher....  anyway... if you learn to manage it you can improve your performance particularly in the vertical when you need it the most.

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What I got out of it is that when they say "course" or "fine" it's analogous to threads on a screw (also called pitch). Fine meaning low blade angle, more threads-per-inch (in this case less distance per rotation, same thing), higher RPM, at the 12:00 side of the gauge.  Probably we're saying the same thing.

 

PS to LL, I think you left out a "t" (furchtbar) in Galland's quote    ;)

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